Briefing July19 main illu

Don’t leave us this way

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What keeps top business talent actively engaged?

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INSIDE

WHO'S WHO THIS MONTH

ISSUE IN BRIEF

Briefing July19 cover

Most of the Briefing audience will have heard of work done on managing ‘sticky relationships’. It’s the way that organisations try to keep people consistently coming back for more of the same, and the promise of better. For example, the phrase has been used to describe the way law firms seek to weave their way deeper into the fabric of most cherished clients. We all like to feel indispensable, right?

But it’s less common to hear businesses talking about achieving stickier relationships with their own employees. They’re more likely to use a word like engagement. Fundamentally, however – for all the great organisational purpose, and the vision, and the values – we’re talking about the same basic challenge. What keeps people wanting to come back to you each day, rather than being tempted by the competition or a change?

 

 

PEOPLE PRIZES

Briefing July19 main illu

Is there a top secret to retaining top talent in law firms? There are certainly plenty of approaches to encouraging and measuring gains in engagement. Jem Sandhu reports.

HOP PERFORMERS

Lewis Silkin partner Laura Farnsworth tells Richard Brent why her launch of the firm’s flexibly resourced fixed-fee offering, rockhopper, was a step forward in the fields of both client relationships and people management.

LAWTECH PEOPLE POWER

If lawyers are to be innovation champions, they need to see how new tech tools will improve their working lives, not just the firm’s fortunes, says Colleen Scimeca, senior product strategist (legal) at Thomson Reuters.

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