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Where e-discovery went next

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It’s e-discovery Jim, but not as we know it

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WHAT'S INSIDE?

ISSUE IN BRIEF

How did e-discovery get so interesting? It used to be one of the most routine things – now it’s the only way we’ll drag the cost of litigation down (if we care to). But it’s got another trick up its sleeve: it can help law firms and clients be much better information managers, which is more important than many people realise.

If you’re thinking this issue should be called ‘E-disclosure’, you have a point – but no, we don’t agree. Even our keynote interviewee, Jonathan Maas, has given up calling it e-disclosure. I think calling the technology and process of automated/electronic sifting and assessment of electronically stored information ‘e-discovery’ helps separate it from ‘disclosure’.

 

TAMING THE DATA MONSTER

Rupert White talks to Jonathan Maas, assistant director at Ernst & Young about why the role of the law firm in disclosure is changing – and how e-discovery tools are helping firms inside their own walls

EMPOWERING LITIGATION SUPPORT

E-discovery is now about much more than just document review – the tools can be used in fee-earning and information management, and the people are having to learn a new basket of skills, Joanna Goodman reports

ADVANTAGE, TECHNOLOGY

Johannes Scholtes, ZyLAB’s chairman and chief strategy officer, reveals the big challenges in e-discovery – and some solutions

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BRIEFING DATABASE: SEPTEMBER 2019


In partnership with Peer Monitor
September 2019
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EDITOR’S LETTER


Richard Brent
Editor-in-chief, Briefing